The HarmTrace package

[Tags: gpl, library, program]

HarmTrace: Harmony Analysis and Retrieval of Music with Type-level Representations of Abstract Chords Entities

We present HarmTrace, a system for automatically analysing the harmony of music sequences. HarmTrace is described in the paper:

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Versions0.1, 0.1.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 1.0, 2.0, 2.1, 2.2.0
Change logNone available
Dependenciesarray, base (>=4.2 && <4.5), binary (==0.5.*), deepseq, Diff (==0.1.*), directory, filepath, hmatrix (>=, hmatrix-gsl-stats (>=, instant-generics (>=0.3.1 && <0.4), ListLike (>=3.0.1), mtl, parallel (>=3), parseargs (>=, process (>=1.0), regex-tdfa (==1.1.*), template-haskell (>=2.4 && <2.7), uu-parsinglib (>=2.7.1), vector (>=0.7) [details]
Copyright(c) 2010--2011 Universiteit Utrecht
AuthorW. Bas de Haas and Jose Pedro Magalhaes,
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UploadedFri Oct 21 08:29:54 UTC 2011 by JosePedroMagalhaes
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For package maintainers and hackage trustees

Readme for HarmTrace-1.0

HarmTrace (Harmony Analysis and Retrieval of Music with Type-level 
Representations of Abstract Chords Entities) is a system for automatic harmony 
analysis of music. It takes a sequence of chords as input and produces a harmony 
analysis, which can be visualised as a tree. 

Music theory has been essential in composing and performing music for centuries. 
Within Western tonal music, from the early Baroque on to modern-day jazz and pop 
music, the function of chords within a chord sequence can be explained by 
harmony theory. Although Western tonal harmony theory is a thoroughly studied 
area, formalising this theory is a hard problem. 

With HarmTrace we have developed a formalisation of the rules of tonal harmony 
as a Haskell (generalized) algebraic datatype. Given a sequence of chord labels, 
the harmonic function of a chord in its tonal context is automatically derived. 
For this, we use several advanced functional programming techniques, such as 
type-level computations, datatype-generic programming, and error-correcting 
parsers. Our functional model of harmony offers various benefits: it can be used 
to define harmonic similarity measures and facilitate music retrieval, or it can 
help musicologists in batch-analysing large corpora of digitised scores, for 

More information about HarmTrace, including how to use and example output, is
available on its webpage: