cpsa: Symbolic cryptographic protocol analyzer

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The Cryptographic Protocol Shapes Analyzer (CPSA) attempts to enumerate all essentially different executions possibe for a cryptographic protocol. We call them the shapes of the protocol. Naturally occurring protocols have only finitely many, indeed very few shapes. Authentication and secrecy properties are easy to determine from them, as are attacks and anomalies.

For each input problem, the CPSA program is given some initial behavior, and it discovers what shapes are compatible with it. Normally, the initial behavior is from the point of view of one participant. The analysis reveals what the other participants must have done, given the participant's view. The search is based on a high-level algorithm that was claimed to be complete, i.e. every shape can in fact be found in a finite number of steps. Further theoretical work showed classes of executions that are not found by the algorithm, however it also showed that every omitted execution requires an unnatural interpretation of a protocol's roles. Hence the algorithm is complete relative to natural role semantics.

The package contains a set of programs used to perform and display the analysis. A standards complient browser, such as Firefox, Safari, or Chrome, is required to display the results. Program documentation is in the doc directory in the source distribution, and installed in the package's data directory. You can locate the package's data directory by typing "cpsa --help" to a command prompt. New users should start learning to use the tool from the manual, found at "cpsamanual.pdf" in the data directory. Examples referenced in the manual can be found in the data directory as well. It is suggested that users make an examples directory and copy "*.scm *.xhtml" to their local examples directory, both so that they may be modified and for ease of access.

Serious Windows users should install MSYS so as to allow the use of make and script execution.

The theory and algorithm used by CPSA was developed with the help of Joshua D. Guttman, John D. Ramsdell, Jon C. Herzog, Shaddin F. Doghmi, F. Javier Thayer, Paul D. Rowe, and Moses D. Liskov. John D. Ramsdell and Moses D. Liskov implemented the algorithm in Haskell. CPSA was designed and implemented at The MITRE Corporation.


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Change log ChangeLog
Dependencies base (==4.*), containers, directory, parallel [details]
License BSD-3-Clause
Author
Maintainer mliskov@mitre.org
Category Cryptography
Source repo head: git clone git://github.com/mitre/cpsa.git
Uploaded by mliskov at 2020-05-27T18:10:11Z
Distributions NixOS:3.6.6
Executables cpsa2latex, cpsagoalsat, cpsainit, cpsamatch, cpsadebase, cpsajson, cpsapp, cpsaprot, cpsasas, cpsadiff, cpsaannotations, cpsashapes, cpsagraph, cpsa
Downloads 33309 total (150 in the last 30 days)
Rating 2.0 (votes: 1) [estimated by Bayesian average]
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Status Hackage Matrix CI
Docs not available [build log]
Last success reported on 2020-05-28 [all 3 reports]

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Readme for cpsa-3.6.6

[back to package description]
CPSA: Crptographic Protocol Shapes Analyzer Version 3

The Cryptographic Protocol Shapes Analyzer (CPSA), is a software tool
designed to assist in the design and analysis of cryptographic
protocols.  A cryptographic protocol is a specific pattern of
interaction between principals.  TLS and IKE are some examples of
well-known cryptographic protocols.

CPSA attempts to enumerate all essentially different executions
possible for a cryptographic protocol.  We call them the shapes of the
protocol.  Naturally occurring protocols have only finitely many,
indeed very few shapes.  Authentication and secrecy properties are
easy to determine from them, as are attacks and anomalies.

For each input problem, the CPSA program is given some initial
behavior, and it discovers what shapes are compatible with it.
Normally, the initial behavior is from the point of view of one
participant.  The analysis reveals what the other participants must
have done, given the participant's view.

CPSA version 3 features support for Diffie-Hellman and state.  The
manual in <doc/cpsamanual.pdf> provides a comprehensive description of
the program.

CPSA: Cryptographic Protocol Shapes Analyzer

This program has been built and tested using Haskell Platform.
It is available from <http://haskell.org> or from an operating
system specific source.  The name of the Linux package is usually
haskell-platform.

If the Internet is available, install CPSA with:

$ cabal update
$ cabal install cpsa

Find the documentation directory by typing "cpsa -h" in a command
shell, and view index.html in a browser.

INSTALLING FROM A TARBALL

Build and install with:

$ cabal configure
$ cabal build
$ cabal install
: To find the directory containing documentation and samples, type:
$ cpsa4 -h

QUICK START (Linux)

: To analyze a protocol you have put in prob.scm type:
$ cpsa -o prob.txt prob.scm
$ cpsagraph -o prob.xhtml prob.txt
$ firefox -remote "openFile(`pwd`/prob.xhtml)"

QUICK START (Mac)

: To analyze a protocol you have put in prob.scm type:
$ cpsa -o prob.txt prob.scm
$ cpsagraph -o prob.xhtml prob.txt
$ open prob.xhtml

QUICK START (Windows)

With Cygwin or MinGW, the installation is similar to the Linux
install.  The software has been tested on a Windows system on which
neither MinGW or Cygwin has been installed.  Install Haskell Platform
Core and then run:

C:\...> cabal update
C:\...> cabal install parallel
C:\...> cabal configure
C:\...> cabal build
C:\...> cabal install

Documentation and samples are in the directory given by
C:\...> cpsa -h

The installed programs can be run from the command prompt or via a
batch file.  Alternatively, copy doc/Make.hs into the directory
containing your CPSA problem statements, and load it into a Haskell
interpreter.  Read the source for usage instructions.

MAKEFILE

To start your own project, create a fresh directory and then type:

$ cpsainit

This will create a Makefile that automates the analysis process.  For
Windows, it will also create Make4.hs, a cpsa build script written in
Haskell.

PARALLELISM

CPSA is built so it can make use of multiple processors.  To make use
of more than one processor, start CPSA with the -N runtime flag, as in
"+RTS -N -RTS".  The GHC documentation describes the -N option in
detail.

TEST SUITE

: To run the test suite type:
$ ./cpsatst

Tests with the .scm extension are expected to complete without error,
tests with the .lsp extension are expected to fail, and tests with the
.lisp extension are not run.  New users should read tst/README, and
then browse the files it suggests while reading CPSA documentation.

Don't develop your protocols in the tst directory.  The Makefile is
optimized for testing the cpsa program, not analyzing protocols.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS

The src directory of the source distributions includes programs
written in Scheme, Prolog, Elisp, and OCaml for performing tasks.  Use
them as templates for your special purpose CPSA analysis and
transformation needs.  Also, when given the --json option, the CPSA
pretty printer cpsapp will transform CPSA S-expressions into
JavaScript Object Notation (JSON).

On Linux, the GHC runtime can request so much memory that thrashing
results.  The script in src/ghcmemlimit sets an environment variable
that limits memory to the amount of free and reclaimable memory on
your machine.

KNOWN BUGS

Variable separation in generalization fails to separate variables in
terms of the form (ltk a a).