The sequential-index package

[Tags: bsd3, library]

Sequential index numbers between 0.0 and 1.0 that allow arbitrarily inserting new numbers in between. They can possibly used for disk-based and other special containers, where adding a new element without changing the indexes of the other elements is important. Conceptually, SequentialIndex denotes a path to an element in an imaginary binary tree. However, leafs can only be on the right side of their parent. I.e. the path must end with a 1 (or be the path to the root node, 0.0). 1.0 denotes the invalid node.


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Properties

Versions0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.2.0.1
Change logNone available
Dependenciesbase (>=4.2.0.0 && <5), bytestring (>=0.9.1.5 && <0.11) [details]
LicenseBSD3
CopyrightCopyright (C) 2011 Aristid Breitkreuz
AuthorAristid Breitkreuz
Maintaineraristidb@googlemail.com
CategoryData
Home pagehttps://github.com/aristidb/sequential-index
UploadedTue Jan 29 14:50:34 UTC 2013 by AristidBreitkreuz
DistributionsNixOS:0.2.0.1
Downloads653 total (26 in last 30 days)
Votes
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StatusDocs uploaded by user
Build status unknown [no reports yet]

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Readme for sequential-index-0.2.0.1

Sequential index numbers between 0.0 and 1.0 that allow arbitrarily inserting new numbers in between. They can possibly used for disk-based and other special containers, where adding a new element without changing the indexes of the other elements is important.

Conceptually, SequentialIndex denotes a path to an element in an imaginary binary tree, with a '1' at the end. Except for 0.0 and 1.0, which are logically on the left or on the right of the entire tree.

So logically, the tree looks roughly like this:

0.0                          1.0
                            /
                /----------/
              0.1
              / \
          /--/   \--\
         /           \
       0.01         0.11
       / \          / \
  0.001   0.011     ...

Note that 0.0 is not connected to any other node, but it is still logically smaller than all nodes.